UF Engineer Develops Full Color 3D Scanning Microscope

“Mr. Robert Harker, an Engineer working for Dr. Ion Ghiviriga in Chemistry’s own Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Lab was granted a US utility patent for the following new and useful invention: “Full Spectrum Lapidary 3D Image Scanner and Method,” US Patent 7840300 B2. These technologies are available free to any UF researcher and are in keeping with the innovation goals of the university. This patent could not have been issued without the extremely helpful support of the UF Office of Technology and Licensing. The inventor would like to express special thanks to Dr. Ion Ghiviriga, Mr. Bruce Clary, Mr. David Day, and Dr. Win Phillips. This novel invention uses polishing techniques to slowly polish or abrade away stepped layers of an object to be scanned. It is 100{3c0caad52c08e46b57c1dc946e6f87c810c2d6c46589b97ffcbbf8f3a9791f0d} sample destructive. The scanned object is cast into a contrasting resin which both hardens and provides a dark, light, or colored background for high contrast photography. The layers are digitally photographed stepwise to produce a record of internal structures. 2D digital images are reassembled using computer and software methods to produce exquisitely finely detailed 3D digital models of the solid internal structures in full color beyond the reach of most researchers.”

UF Engineer Develops Full Color 3D Scanning Microscope

“Mr. Robert Harker, an Engineer working for Dr. Ion Ghiviriga in Chemistry’s own Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Lab was granted a US utility patent for the following new and useful invention: “Full Spectrum Lapidary 3D Image Scanner and Method,” US Patent 7840300 B2. These technologies are available free to any UF researcher and are in keeping with the innovation goals of the university. This patent could not have been issued without the extremely helpful support of the UF Office of Technology and Licensing. The inventor would like to express special thanks to Dr. Ion Ghiviriga, Mr. Bruce Clary, Mr. David Day, and Dr. Win Phillips. This novel invention uses polishing techniques to slowly polish or abrade away stepped layers of an object to be scanned. It is 100{3c0caad52c08e46b57c1dc946e6f87c810c2d6c46589b97ffcbbf8f3a9791f0d} sample destructive. The scanned object is cast into a contrasting resin which both hardens and provides a dark, light, or colored background for high contrast photography. The layers are digitally photographed stepwise to produce a record of internal structures. 2D digital images are reassembled using computer and software methods to produce exquisitely finely detailed 3D digital models of the solid internal structures in full color beyond the reach of most researchers.”

Soumya Sarkar wins the UF Graduate Teaching Assistant Award

“Soumya Sarkar, a graduate student in Prof. Adam Veige’s research group, has received the UF graduate student teaching assistant award. A university wide faculty committee responsible for selecting the award winners sends members to visit and review the classes/labs of each nominee. Soumya will receive a certificate and $500 from the graduate school. The award ceremony will take place in the University auditorium on April 22nd, 2011.”

Soumya Sarkar wins the UF Graduate Teaching Assistant Award

“Soumya Sarkar, a graduate student in Prof. Adam Veige’s research group, has received the UF graduate student teaching assistant award. A university wide faculty committee responsible for selecting the award winners sends members to visit and review the classes/labs of each nominee. Soumya will receive a certificate and $500 from the graduate school. The award ceremony will take place in the University auditorium on April 22nd, 2011.”

UF Chemistry entry reaches Final Four in 2011 Cade Prize Competition

“Graduate Student Ryan Martin and Professor Stephen A. Miller have reached the Final Four in the competition for the 2011 Cade Prize for Innovation. Their entry is titled “Polyesteracetals” and focuses on novel biorenewable and degradable polymers and copolymers that mimic or improve upon existing packaging plastics. Their entry reached the Final Four in the 2010 Cade Prize competition as well, but the new submission has undergone changes and improvements based on recent laboratory results. The final competition will occur on May 12th and the 2011 Cade Prize winner will be announced at a Gala that evening, to be held at Sante Fe College. The winner will receive a $50,000 award and one year of complimentary space at the Gainesville Technology Enterprise Center (GTEC). The three runners-up will each receive a $5,000 award. Tickets for the Gala can be purchased at the Cade Museum website.”

UF Chemistry entry reaches Final Four in 2011 Cade Prize Competition

“Graduate Student Ryan Martin and Professor Stephen A. Miller have reached the Final Four in the competition for the 2011 Cade Prize for Innovation. Their entry is titled “Polyesteracetals” and focuses on novel biorenewable and degradable polymers and copolymers that mimic or improve upon existing packaging plastics. Their entry reached the Final Four in the 2010 Cade Prize competition as well, but the new submission has undergone changes and improvements based on recent laboratory results. The final competition will occur on May 12th and the 2011 Cade Prize winner will be announced at a Gala that evening, to be held at Sante Fe College. The winner will receive a $50,000 award and one year of complimentary space at the Gainesville Technology Enterprise Center (GTEC). The three runners-up will each receive a $5,000 award. Tickets for the Gala can be purchased at the Cade Museum website.”

Prof. Wei receives 2011 Sigma Xi Junior Faculty Research Award

“W. David Wei, Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and member of the NSF-CCI center for Nanostructured Electronic Materials, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, has received 2011 Sigma Xi Junior Faculty Research award presented by the University of Florida Chapter. The award is based on the quality of research he has completed and the likelihood of future success in research. Wei was honored with the award at the Sigma Xi annual banquet held April 7, 2011.”

Prof. Wei receives 2011 Sigma Xi Junior Faculty Research Award

“W. David Wei, Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and member of the NSF-CCI center for Nanostructured Electronic Materials, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, has received 2011 Sigma Xi Junior Faculty Research award presented by the University of Florida Chapter. The award is based on the quality of research he has completed and the likelihood of future success in research. Wei was honored with the award at the Sigma Xi annual banquet held April 7, 2011.”

Prof. Castellano, 2011 HHMI Science for Life Distinguished Mentor

“Ron Castellano, Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry, has been named a 2011 HHMI Science for Life Distinguished Mentor. The award is given annually and honors excellence in undergraduate mentoring. Dr. Castellano was one of three UF faculty presented with the award at the Annual Spring Undergraduate Research Awards reception held March 28, 2011 at the UF President’s House. Ron joins a number of previous awardees from the Department of Chemistry including Jon Stewart (2006), Lisa McElwee-White (2007), Adrian Roitberg (2007), Gail Fanucci (2009), and Weihong Tan (2010). In addition to the title, Distinguished Mentor faculty receive $5,000 per year for two years to be spent at their discretion.”

Prof. Castellano, 2011 HHMI Science for Life Distinguished Mentor

“Ron Castellano, Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry, has been named a 2011 HHMI Science for Life Distinguished Mentor. The award is given annually and honors excellence in undergraduate mentoring. Dr. Castellano was one of three UF faculty presented with the award at the Annual Spring Undergraduate Research Awards reception held March 28, 2011 at the UF President’s House. Ron joins a number of previous awardees from the Department of Chemistry including Jon Stewart (2006), Lisa McElwee-White (2007), Adrian Roitberg (2007), Gail Fanucci (2009), and Weihong Tan (2010). In addition to the title, Distinguished Mentor faculty receive $5,000 per year for two years to be spent at their discretion.”