People

Photo of Khalil A. Abboud
Khalil A. Abboud Scientist; Director,
Center for X-ray Crystallography
Phone:  352-392-9151
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The X-Ray laboratory at the University of Florida/Department of Chemistry provides single crystal structure determination expertise to characterize newly synthesized materials. All crystals of Organic, Inorganic, Organometallic, Metal organic and Metal clusters can be analyzed after their X-Ray diffraction patterns and intensities, which are scattered by the electron clouds around atoms, are measured.

Our aim is to provide detailed three-dimensional architectures of molecules in the crystalline state. A knowledge which can be used to confirm the identity of the materials, provide insight to their formation and parameters for the optimization of the synthetic process, and to further our understanding of their microscopic and macroscopic properties.

Additionally, we have collaborative research projects with industrial companies pursuing further knowledge in catalysis and with academic institutions in the field of drug design.

Experience and interest includes: catalysis, chemical crystallography, clusters, coordination chemistry, crystal engineering, data collection and processing, disorder, hydrogen bonding, inorganic compounds, materials science, natural products, organic compounds, organometallic compounds, polymorphism, quasicrystals, semiconductors, small molecules, structural chemistry, structure determination, structure-activity relationships, superconductors, synchrotron radiation, teaching and education, X-ray diffraction, NLO, small molecule.

Olajuyigbe Amos Adebayo Graduate Student
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Akhil Raj Ahir Graduate Student
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Tural N Akhmedov Graduate Student
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Jonathan Allison Chemist IIILab / Mass Spec
Phone:  352-392-0566
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Khalid Mohammed Alqahtani Graduate Student
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Erica Danielle Amato Graduate Student
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Photo of Alexander Angerhofer
Alexander Angerhofer Professor,
Associate Chair
Phone:  352-392-9489
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Photosynthesis:

We utilize modern EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) methods at X-band (9.6 GHz) as well as at ultra-high frequencies (94- 670 GHz) to obtain structural and dynamic information about paramagnetic states in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes. This leads to a better understanding of fundamental electron and triplet energy transfer processes in plant and bacterial photosynthesis.

Mn-Containing Enzymes:

We are developing new pulsed and high-field EPR methods to obtain structural information about the coordination environment of Mn(II) and Mn(III) species in synthetic model systems and in the Mn-dependent enzyme oxalate decarboxylase. The investigation of transient intermediates in the enzyme-substrate complex is expected to reveal the reaction mechanism.

Urate-Derived Free Radicals:

We are using EPR spin trapping in conjunction with other spectroscopies (UV/VIS, HPLC, mass spec, etc.) to identify the radical intermediates in the reaction of uric acid with biological oxidants. This research is performed in collaboration with Prof. Richard Johnson at the Dept. of Nephrology and has potential wide ranging implications on the mechanisms of diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

Photo of Aaron Aponick
Aaron Aponick Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies
Phone:  352-392-3484
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Research in our lab is directed at the development of new synthetic methodology to address difficulties in target-oriented synthesis. To control specificity, nature has evolved enzymes that perform chemical reactions with exquisite chemo- diastereo- and enantioselectivity. Our goal is to develop new small molecule catalysts that exhibit synthetically useful levels of selectivity in new chemical transformations. The significance of this work lies in its application to synthesis. Particular attention is given to bioactive natural products with interesting molecular architecture, wherein the objective is to develop efficient synthetic strategies that facilitate extensive structural modifications to probe biological activity. Students in our group will be exposed to the full repertoire of reactions and learn the analytical skills to plan, execute, and optimize reaction sequences.

Jeffrey Matthew Arciola Graduate Student
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Benjamin B Arline Graduate Student
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Carolyn Michelle Averback Graduate Student
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Radi Awartani Ph.D Courtesy ProfessorPresident, Petra Research Inc.
Phone:  386-462-0414
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Dwight Bailey IT Senior
Phone:  352-392-7885
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Laura Sue Bailey Graduate Student
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Brooke Elizabeth Barnes Graduate Student
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Rutecleia P. Barros Program Assistant
Phone:  352-392-0545
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Renan Barroso Ferreira Graduate Student
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Ricardo Barroso Ferreira Graduate Student
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Photo of Rodney J. Bartlett
Rodney J. Bartlett Graduate Research Professor
Phone:  352-392-6974
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Rod Bartlett pioneered the development of coupled-cluster (CC) theory in quantum chemistry to offer highly accurate solutions of the Schroedinger equation for molecular structure and spectra, presenting the CCSD, CCSD[T], CCSDT, CCSDT[Qf], and CCSDTQ methods among many others. He extended the CC theory to excited, ionized, and electron attached states with his equation-of-motion EOM-CC methods. His group formulated analytical gradient theory for CC theory, making it possible to readily search potential energy surfaces and to provide vibrational spectra. His group introduced the STEOM-CC extensions for excited states.

His group is also responsible for the widely used ACES II and massively parallel ACES III program system. He is the author of more than 500 journal articles and book chapters. He is the co-author with Isaiah Shavitt of the definitive book on coupled-cluster theory, “Many-Body Methods in Chemistry and Physics: MBPT and Coupled-Cluster theory,” Cambridge Press, 2009.

Research topics include:

* The search for metastable, high-energy density molecules (HEDM) like N4 N8, and N5-, which he has long predicted to exist. (The pentazole anion, an aromatic five-membered ring, was recently observed for the first time in negative ion mass spectra and in solution by NMR, verifying his prediction).
* Non-linear optical properties of molecules, where his work resolved long-standing discrepancies between theory and electric-field induced second and third harmonic generation experiments. The new theory produced in this work introduced any-order time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory for frequency dependent properties and that for the initial time-dependent CC results.
* Carbon clusters, where his work on the rhombic form of C4, which he found to be competitive in stability with its linear triplet form, has been instrumental in the closed-shell vs. open-shell debate about small carbon clusters. Cyclic forms of C5 and C6 have been observed spectroscopically, while reports of rhombic C4 have been reported in Coulomb explosion experiments.
* NMR coupling constants. His EOM-CCSD work is the first to offer predictive results for NMR coupling constants whose average errors are~ 3Hz. With this tool, he provided fingerprints for the non-classical bridged H atom in ethylcarbenium and the bridged, pentacoordinate C atom in the 2-norbornyl cation which had resisted experimental determination. The latter results are also in exceptional agreement with the coupling constants that could be obtained experimentally by Olah, substantiating the accuracy of his predictions. For H bonds he provides formulae to relate the two-atom coupling constant to the distance between the atoms that are H-bonded which provides a new probe to assist biomolecular structure determination that is complementary to Xray determination where the H atoms cannot be observed.

His group continually introduces new correlated quantum chemical methods:

* New correlated methods for polymers, recently reporting the first CCSD results.
* Ab Initio density functional theory, an approach that unlike other current hybrid or gradient corrected DFT methods has to converge to the right answer in the limit like ab initio quantum chemistry. The most recent work derives the exact exchange-correlation potential of DFT from coupled-cluster theory, making a seamless connection between wave-function theory and density functional theory.
* The “transfer Hamiltonian” procedure to make it possible to do quantum mechanically based, “predictive” simulations for materials.
* The natural linear scaled NLSCC methods for very large molecules.

Ashton Nikole Bartley Graduate Student
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Akash Kumar Basak Graduate Student
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Photo of Kari B. Basso
Kari B. Basso Scientist
Phone:  352-392-8782
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Christopher D. Batich Affiliate Professor
Phone:  352-392-6630
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Alexandre Patrick Philippe Bazante Graduate Student
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Christopher Richard Beekman Graduate Student
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Matthew Ramon Bell Graduate Student
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Kyle Clinton Bentz Graduate Student
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Christopher Coyle Beto Graduate Student
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Candace Biggerstaff Teaching Lab Specialist I
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Stephen John Blackband Affiliate ProfessorProfessor, Department of NeuroscienceUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-846-2854
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Duane Calvin Bock Graduate Student
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Damian Borrelli Office Assistant
Phone:  352.392.0542
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Photo of Glenn D. Boutilier Ph.D.
Glenn D. Boutilier Ph.D. Research FellowProctor & Gamble
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Dr. Glenn Boutilier received the B.S. degree in chemistry from Colorado State University in 1974. He studied at the University of Florida with James D. Winefordner and received the Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry in 1978. Post doctoral study followed at the University of Georgia, where Glenn studied with Professors L. B. Rogers and L. A. Carreira. He joined Procter & Gamble in 1980, where he is currently a Research Fellow, Victor Mills Society. Dr. Boutilier’s work has focused on areas of adhesive and polymer technology, especially the development of high performance photopolymers. He is inventor or coinventor on more than 20 patents and has made key contributions to the success of the P&G proprietary papermaking process. Dr. Boutilier promotes effective undergraduate and graduate education in the analytical sciences by offering the popular Industrial Analytical Short Course. Dr. Boutilier is a member of the American Chemical Society and the Society for Applied Spectroscopy. He has served the latter organization in many capacities, including Chairman of the Cincinnati Section.

Photo of Clifford R. Bowers
Clifford R. Bowers Professor
Phone:  352-846-0839
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The Bowers research is presently focused on the mechanisms for nuclear spin order enhancement (e.g. hyperpolarization) for magnetic resonance sensitivity enhancement and the application to problems of importance in materials science and biochemical-physics. Areas of recent research activity include the following: (i) adsorption, diffusion and exchange in nanotube materials for gas separations (ii) studies of dynamics, order/disorder and porosity in polymers by solid state NMR (iii) xenon NMR as a probe of anesthetic properties in lipid membrane bilayers (iv) resistively detected NMR studies in the regime of the quantum Hall effect in GaAs Quantum Wells (v) optically pumped NMR studies.

Christopher Richard Brewer Graduate Student
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Photo of Wallace S. Brey
Wallace S. Brey Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-0520
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NMR spectroscopy, particularly as applied to fluorine compounds, peptides, metal ions in solution, interactions of metal ions with biolgical molecules.

William Lloyd Ambrose Brooks Graduate Student
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Photo of Philip J. Brucat
Philip J. Brucat Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-2006
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Chemistry is the science of making new molecules, understanding and predicting their properties, and controlling and manipulating those properties toward our own end. It is natural to push the limits of such a strategy by attempting to synthesize more and more bizarre molecules with exotic and unpredictable properties. My interests include making small molecules (ions) with unusual chemical bonds and measuring their detailed quantum-mechanical structure spectroscopically, i.e, with light. This quest has largely focused on open-shell species containing transition-metals, and sometimes even rare-gas atoms, isolated in the gas-phase and cooled to nearly absolute zero of temperature.

Photo of Steven D. Bruner
Steven D. Bruner Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-0525
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Structurally complex natural products, such as the medicinally relevant antibiotics vancomycin and erthromycin, are biosynthesized by large, macromolecular enzyme assemblies. These assemblies frequently orchestrate difficult and interesting chemical transformations t construct diverse molecular scaffolds. Our research group will use the tools of synthetic organic chemistry, enzymology and structural biology to dissect the mechanism of these systems. A detailed understanding of the biosynthesis of natural products will be extended to the development of new synthetic methodology and to the engineering of biological systems to produce novel molecules with desired properties.

James D Bullock Graduate Student
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Matthew Joseph Burg Graduate Student
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Joshua Bush Scientific Laboratory Manager
Phone:  352-392-3699
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Photo of Rebecca A. Butcher
Rebecca A. Butcher Associate Professor
Phone:  352-846-3392
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Our group is interested in how organisms use small molecules to communicate information. Caenorhabditis elegans (a small roundworm) is a genetically tractable organism that relies on a fine-tuned sense of smell and taste when interacting with other members of its species and with its environment. Thus, C. elegans represents an ideal system for studying the role of environmental cues, such as pheromones and nutritional signals, in modulating development and other complex processes. Our group will use NMR-based small molecule structure elucidation, chemical synthesis, chemical genetics, and biochemical/biological assays to identify the chemical nature of these cues and their mechanism of action. This work will provide fundamental new insights into how environmental signals influence development, metabolism, behavior, and aging in C. elegans and in higher organisms.

Maria Del Pilar Buteler Graduate Student
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Ren Cai Graduate Student
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John Marcus Cain Graduate Student
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Lucas Caire da Silva Graduate Student
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Sena Cansiz Graduate Student
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Photo of Y. Charles Cao
Y. Charles Cao Professor
Phone:  352-392-9839
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Our research interests focus on addressing the problems that are at the interface of nanochemistry and bio-analytical chemistry. Combinations of biological and material components with complementary properties will be developed as powerful tools for fabricating functional nanostructures and characterizing the biological world. In particular, our research starts from three directions: nanocrystal synthesis, nanocrystal assembly, and nanocrystals for use as biological markers.

Will Gaston Carden Graduate Student
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Richard Nicholas Carmean Graduate Student
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Frederick Cartwright Teaching Lab Specialist
Phone:  352-392-6238
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Joseph Carusone Systems Programer
Phone:  352-392-7885
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Jessica June Cash Graduate Student
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Photo of Ronald K. Castellano
Ronald K. Castellano Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-2752
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Research in my laboratory uses organic synthesis, physical organic chemistry, spectroscopic methods, and computation to design, prepare, and study novel organic molecules that show unique and useful behavior. In this context we are particularly interested in predicting and controlling properties that emerge when individual molecules aggregate, by weak noncovalent interactions, in solution. The phenomenon is called “self-assembly,” and it is a process borrowed from nature to achieve complexity rapidly and reversibly (e.g., assembly of the DNA duplex or binding of a receptor to its enzymatic target). It is also the central theme of supramolecular chemistry, an established field that studies chemistry “beyond the molecule.” Our specific areas of interest and expertise include: stereoelectronic effects in supramolecular chemistry, construction of novel donor-acceptor molecules with useful electronic or optical properties, functional molecules (for materials and/or sensing applications) from biorelevant building blocks, and molecular-based strategies to novel therapeutics.

Seda Cekli Graduate Student
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Qirui Chang Graduate Student
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Rahul Chatterjee Graduate Student
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Daniel Chaves Claudino Graduate Student
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Wei-Hung Chen Graduate Student
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Xigao Chen Graduate Student
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Hai-Ping Cheng Affiliate ProfessorProfessor, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-392-1597
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Hyunjun Choe Graduate Student
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Photo of George Christou
George Christou Drago and Distinguished Professor
Phone:  352-392-6737
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Christou group research is in the synthesis and study of polynuclear transition metal cluster compounds of relevance to several areas, including bioinorganic and materials chemistry. We develop synthetic routes to novel, high nuclearity clusters of the 3d metals V to Cu, with the largest to date being a Mn84 wheel-like compound. We have a particularly strong interest in clusters of Mn and Fe for their often unusual and even unique magnetic properties, such as abnormally high numbers of unpaired electrons and the resulting ability to function as nanoscale magnets. These have potential applications to high-density information storage and quantum computing, which has made them of great interest to chemists, physicists and materials scientists alike. We employ a variety of characterization techniques, including NMR and EPR spectroscopies, electrochemistry, magnetochemistry, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography.

Adam Paul Cismesia Graduate Student
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Lori Clark Academic Assistant II
Phone:  352-392-0708
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Photo of Samuel O. Colgate
Samuel O. Colgate Adjunct Lecturer
Phone:  352-392-5876
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Our chemistry focuses on total synthesis of biologically active molecules and the design of new synthetic methodology, including antibiotics, antitumor agents, tumor promoters, cytotoxic agents, anti-HIV and anti-leukemic compounds. The construction of these molecules uses novel synthetic intermediates such as tin ketyls, samarium ketyls and free radical cyclizations. Cycloadditions are used to form multiple rings in a single step with complete regio- and stereocontrol include carbonyl-ylide [3+2]-cycloadditions and [5+2]-cycloadditions with 3-oxidopyrylium intermediates.

Photo of Coray Colina
Coray Colina Professor
Phone:  352-294-3488
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Professor Colina was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She was previously a faculty member at Simán Bolívar University and joined the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University as Associate Professor in January 2007. She won the 1999 Award for Outstanding Teaching Achievement (at the Assistant Professor level) at Simán Bolívar University, as well as several other awards from the Venezuelan’s National Committees from the Development of Higher Education and for the Academic Advancement.

Coray has several international collaborations and has presented the results of her research globally in more than 100 national and international conferences. She has published over 51 papers (including conference proceedings).

Photo of Michael J. Collins Ph.D.
Michael J. Collins Ph.D. President & CEOCEM Corporation
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Michael J. Collins graduated Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry. He received his PhD in Physical Chemistry from the University of Texas. His research focused on the use of microwave spectroscopy for structural determination of small molecules.

CEM Corporation was co-founded in 1978 by Dr. Collins, who is currently president and CEO of the company. CEM is the leading provider of microwave solutions for the laboratory and life sciences marketplace, with over 35,000 systems sold worldwide and more than 200 patents for microwave and related technologies.

Dr. Collins has received many entrepreneurial awards since the founding of CEM and in 1990 was named “Entrepreneur of the Year” for North Carolina by Inc. Magazine. He is a current member and board director of ALSSA (Analytical & Life Science Systems Association). He has had numerous publications in various trade journals and was a contributing author in a ACS professional reference book entitled, Introduction to Microwave Sample Preparation, Theory and Practice. He also was co-author of a chapter in the recently published book entitled Microwaves in Organic Chemistry.

Brian Cook Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-294-2165
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Michael T. Costanzo Graduate Student
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Photo of Nancy P. Crews Ph.D.
Nancy P. Crews Ph.D. Chief Executive OfficerCustom Manufacturing & Engineering™
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Dr. Nancy P. Crews is Chief Executive Officer and owner of Custom Manufacturing & Engineering? (CME?), a Power & Sensors company serving both government and commercial markets. With extensive experience in strategic planning, market development, sales management, and product development and research, Dr. Crews has led CME to achieve growth and stability as a mature, larger small business conducting research and development, product testing, manufacturing, and engineering services. Prior to starting CME, Dr. Crews was employed as a Senior Manager by Lockheed Martin Specialty Components, Inc. Before joining Lockheed Martin, Dr. Crews worked for Eastman Kodak Corporation in a variety of managerial positions, including serving as a Marketing Director for Reprographics Products; Program Manager, Product Development Manager, and a Research Scientist. Additionally, she was an original member of the business reengineering team working on streamlining Kodak’s business processes. Dr. Crews earned her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Virginia Tech after earning her B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Florida.

Vinicius Wilian Dias Cruzeiro Graduate Student
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Cheng Cui Graduate Student
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Yuqiong Dai Graduate Student
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Abdul Dar Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-294-1321

Address LEI 116

Sayak Das Gupta Graduate Student
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Photo of Tammy A. Davidson
Tammy A. Davidson Senior Lecturer
Phone:  352-392-9134
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One of the main goals that I have is to improve the educational experience that our students have in organic chemistry. As faculty coordinator of the organic chemistry laboratory program, I have the opportunity to introduce students to the many exciting aspects of organic chemistry while reinforcing the material they learn in their lecture courses. I am also interested in designing laboratory experiments that help students see how organic chemistry is connected to other aspects of their lives, including health and well-being, medicine, and materials.

Kern M. Davis M.D. PresidentPathology Associates
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Kern M. Davis, M.D., graduated from UF in 1976 with a B.S. in Chemistry. Post graduation, he earned his M.D. at USF returning to UF for pathology residency. Since 1985 he has practiced pathology in his home town, St. Petersburg, with special interest in anatomic pathology. In 1993 he obtained an MBA at USF and has been the president of Pathology Associates since. Davis recently rejoined the board of directors of United Insurance Holding Corporation, which through wholly-owned subsidiaries, writes and services property and casualty insurance in Florida, South Carolina, and Massachusetts.

Davis is an avid masters swimmer preferring long distance races. He participates in teaching pathology in an introductory class in medicine at his high school alma mater. Kern resides in St. Petersburg with his wife Twila, two daughters Hannah and Sydney, and their labradoodle Valentine.

Stella De Almeida Gonsales Graduate Student
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Christopher Chi-Long Deng Graduate Student
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Lindsey Graham DeRatt Graduate Student
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Photo of Erik Deumens
Erik Deumens Scientist
Phone:  352-392-6980
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My research focus is molecular reaction dynamics including explicit non-adiabatic effects. This is done by solving the Schrodinger equation for the coupled system of nuclei and electrons in the molecules. The method is called END for electron nuclear dynamics. During 2005-2008 we are developing a new wave function for such dynamics called VHF for vector Hartree-Fock. This is based on a fully dynamic, non-orthogonal, multi-configurational wave function.

My second interest is in applying modern software engineering techniques to create reliable high-performance software for the solving this coupled system numerically. I have been working with Prof. Rod Bartlett since 2003 on a new architecture for parallel software and a new programming language called SIAL for super instruction assemble language. This software design is used in the new parallel version ACES III of the electronic structure software developed by Dr. Bartlett and his collaborators.

The parallel scaling performance and absolute performance of the new software is surprisingly good.

Photo of James A. Deyrup
James A. Deyrup Professor Emeritus
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Our chemistry focuses on total synthesis of biologically active molecules and the design of new synthetic methodology, including antibiotics, antitumor agents, tumor promoters, cytotoxic agents, anti-HIV and anti-leukemic compounds. The construction of these molecules uses novel synthetic intermediates such as tin ketyls, samarium ketyls and free radical cyclizations. Cycloadditions are used to form multiple rings in a single step with complete regio- and stereocontrol include carbonyl-ylide [3+2]-cycloadditions and [5+2]-cycloadditions with 3-oxidopyrylium intermediates.

Elizabeth Suzanne Dhummakupt Graduate Student
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Gianna N. Di Francesco Graduate Student
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Natali Victoria Di Russo Graduate Student
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Daniel John Dobbins Graduate Student
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Photo of William R. Dolbier
William R. Dolbier Professor
Phone:  352-392-0591
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The Dolbier research program is dedicated mainly to the synthesis and study of compounds containing fluorine. Organic compounds that contain fluorine are of vital interest and importance to virtually every area of modern technology, including polymers, pharmaceutical/agrochemical products, and material science. Because of the special synthetic challenges that it presents, and because of the unique structure/reactivity relationships observed for fluorine-containing compounds, the field of organofluorine chemistry is one of both fundamental and practical interest. In our case this is reflected by the projects in the group, which are a mixture of fundamental and applied projects. Although we remain interested in the fundamental aspects of reactivity of fluorinated molecules and reactive intermediates, our major research interests now involve the development of new synthetic methods for incorporation of fluorine into organic molecules, mainly through the invention and development of new fluorinated “building blocks.”

Joseph Stephen Duchene Graduate Student
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Katie Marie Dunleavy Graduate Student
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Elly Bowen Earlywine Graduate Student
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Charles Patrick Easterling Graduate Student
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Elizabeth Eddy Grants Assistant
Phone:  352-294-3476
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Arthur Scott Edison Affiliate Associate ProfessorProfessor, Department of GeneticsUniversity of Georgia
Phone:  352-392-4535
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Fabien Emmetiere Graduate Student
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Photo of J. Eric Enholm
J. Eric Enholm Professor
Phone:  352-392-0552
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Our chemistry focuses on total synthesis of biologically active molecules and the design of new synthetic methodology, including antibiotics, antitumor agents, tumor promoters, cytotoxic agents, anti-HIV and anti-leukemic compounds. The construction of these molecules uses novel synthetic intermediates such as tin ketyls, samarium ketyls and free radical cyclizations. Cycloadditions are used to form multiple rings in a single step with complete regio- and stereocontrol include carbonyl-ylide [3+2]-cycloadditions and [5+2]-cycloadditions with 3-oxidopyrylium intermediates.

Kerstin Erickson Senior Secretary
Phone:  352-392-5266
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Jacqueline Marie Esquiaqui Graduate Student
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Ebo Ewusi-Annan Graduate Student
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Juliette Verane Aline Experton Graduate Student
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Photo of John R. Eyler
John R. Eyler Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-0532
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Research in our group is devoted to using special mass spectrometric techniques to study the reactivity and properties of many different ionic systems in the gas phase – from atoms to antibodies. While our work is strongly based in physical chemistry, we have collaborated heavily with inorganic, organic, and analytical chemists in the past, and will continue to work with them and the members of the Department’s biochemistry division in the future. Almost all of our experiments use one of three Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers to form and trap ions for reactivity and spectroscopy studies, as well as to carry out mass analysis.

Many of our current research projects use electrospray ionization (ESI) to transport pre-formed ions from solution into the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The ions in solution range from atomic ions, for elemental analysis and speciation studies, to doubly- or triply-charged organic and inorganic species, to very large multiply-protonated biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. With special care, one or more solvent molecules can be left attached to the ions when they enter the FTICR mass spectrometer, thus allowing the effect of solvation on reactivity or other ion properties, such as spectra, to be studied.

Danielle Elizabeth Fagnani Graduate Student
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Z. Hugh Fan Affiliate Professor,
Department of ChemistryProfessor, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Phone:  352-846-3021
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Photo of Gail E. Fanucci
Gail E. Fanucci Professor
Phone:  352-392-2345
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To address questions regarding structure, function, dynamics, and conformational sampling of biomolecules, our lab utilizes a suite of magnetic resonance techniques. These spectroscopic methods include site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We investigate a diversity of biological systems including binding, structure, and dynamics of membrane associated proteins, conformational changes in RNA riboswitch folding pathways, dynamics of natively unstructured proteins, and conformational sampling in HIV-1 protease.

Frank Farley Office Manager
Phone:  352-392-2012
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Ashley C Felts Graduate Student
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Likui Feng Graduate Student
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Ehsan Fereyduni Graduate Student
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Caue Favero Ferreira Graduate Student
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Amr Mohammed Sayed Feteha Graduate Student
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Charles Adrian Figg Graduate Student
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Madison Kelsey Flint Graduate Student
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John Flowers Coord. Admin. Services
Phone:  352-392-0541
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Michael Edward Fortunato Graduate Student
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Adeline Dominique Fournet Graduate Student
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Sarah Elizabeth Franz Graduate Student
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Taylor William Gaines Graduate Student
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Xiang Gao Graduate Student
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John Jairo Garcia Ocampo Graduate Student
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Bobby Owen Garrett Graduate Student
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Thomas Kiros Ghebreghiorgis Graduate Student
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Photo of Ion Ghiviriga
Ion Ghiviriga Scientist
Phone:  352-846-3001
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Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the most powerful method for elucidation of the structure of organic compounds, and most of our research involves collaborations in which we find out what compounds have been obtained in a particular reaction, or isolated from a natural source. We use dynamic NMR and molecular modeling to study the conformational equilibria of small molecules. Other applications are based on the measurement of diffusion coefficients by NMR.

Tuhin Ghosh Graduate Student
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Nicole Lyn Gibbons Graduate Student
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Emily Louise Gill Graduate Student
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Justin Lloyd Goodsell Graduate Student
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Justin Andrew Goodwin Graduate Student
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Subhadip Goswami Graduate Student
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Photo of George Jeffrey Gower
George Jeffrey Gower Adjunct Lecturer
Phone:  352-392-2155
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Photo of Alexander J. Grenning
Alexander J. Grenning Assistant Professor
Phone:  352-392-9131
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Natural products are prized for the potential as pharmaceutical agents. A common bottleneck toward their application in disease treatment is their limited natural abundance and/or inefficient laboratory synthesis.

The Grenning research laboratory aims to design new complexity-generating chemical reactions inspired by bioactive natural products. This strategy will provide rapid access to a variety of structurally complex bioactive molecules with high step-economy. We plan to utilize the reactions developed to prepare collections of natural product inspired molecules and gain insight into their biological activities.

Clinton “Clint” Grice Accountant I
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Karen Griffin HR/Payroll Manager
Phone:  352-294-3475
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Alan Grivjack Engineering Technician II
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Corey Rachelle Gros Graduate Student
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Robert H. Grubbs Ph.D. Victor and Elizabeth Atkins Professor of ChemistryCalifornia Insitute of Technology
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Professor Grubbs is the current Victor and Elizabeth Atkins Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, a title he has held since 1990. Since 2009 he has held the concurrent position of Chair Professor from the King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.

Professor Grubbs earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry from the University of Florida in 1963 and 1965, respectively. His Masters research was conducted under the direction of Merle Battiste. His Ph.D. in Chemistry from Columbia University was awarded in 1968 and his doctoral advisor was Ronald Breslow.

Professor Grubbs began his academic career as an Assistant Professor at Michigan State in 1969. Subsequently, he became an Associate Professor in 1973 before moving to the California Institute of Technology in 1978 with the title of Professor of Chemistry. Professor Grubbs has garnered a variety of accolades, including the University of Canterbury’s 2nd Canterbury Distinguished Professor (2007), an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science at the University of Florida (2006), the Havinga Medal (2006), Honorary Fellowship of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2006), the Nobel Prize in Chemistry (2005), Fellowship in the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC) (2004), the Tetrahedron Prize for Creativity in Organic Chemistry (2003), the Linus Pauling Award Medal (2003), the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Research in Homogenous or Heterogeneous Catalysis (2003), the American Chemical Society Arthur C. Cope Award (2002), the American Chemical Society Herman F. Mark Polymer Chemistry Award (2000), the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Chemistry (2000), the Fluka Prize – Reagent of the Year (1998), the Nagoya Medal of Organic Chemistry (1997), the American Chemical Society Award in Polymer Chemistry (1995), Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1994), an American Chemical Society Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award (1990), Membership in the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (1989), the American Chemical Society National Award in Organometallic Chemistry (1988), an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship (1975), The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award (1975), and the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship (1974).

Professor Grubbs’ research interests include organometallic synthesis and mechanisms, organic synthesis and reagents, and polymer synthesis. Central to this research is the continued development of olefin metathesis catalysts.

Alican Gulsevin Graduate Student
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Naga Sandhya Guntaka Graduate Student
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Wenxiao Guo Graduate Student
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Yian Guo Graduate Student
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Zhongwu Guo Scott Professor
Phone:  352-392-9133
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Pancham Lal Gupta Graduate Student
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Khanh Quoc Ha Graduate Student
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Stefanie Habenicht Adjunct Lecturer
Phone:  352-273-0550
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Ashlyn Rose Elsie Hale Graduate Student
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Charles Dennis Hall Affiliate
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Bing Han Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-392-0510
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Jungsoo Han Graduate Student
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Robert J. Hanrahan Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-1442
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Robert A. Harker Engineer
Phone:  352-392-4650
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Alice Claire Harmon Affiliate ProfessorProfessor, Department of BiologyUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-392-3217
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Frank Harris Research Professor
Phone:  352-846-3143
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Michael E. Harris Professor
Phone:  352-392-9865
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RNA Molecular Recognition and Catalysis

The past decade has witnessed a rapid increase in our understanding of the essential biological roles of RNA, and how errors in RNA metabolism contribute to cancer, heart disease, and developmental disorders. In our own lab we combine “classic” (but very powerful) tools of mechanistic enzymology with next generation sequencing and bioinformatics to address fundamental unanswered questions that lay at the heart of RNA biochemistry: Do catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) use the same strategies as protein enzymes achieve their catalytic power? How do RNA binding proteins find their cognate binding sites amidst a vast sea of non-cognate binding sites in the transcriptome? Addressing these questions is providing new and often unexpected insights into RNA structure-function relationships, as well as principles useful for engineering novel RNAs or RNA binding proteins with therapeutic potential.

Education and training:

  • 1986: B.S., (Chemistry) 1986 Florida State University
  • 1992: Ph.D. (Biochemistry) 1992 Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (lab of Dr. Stephen Hajduk)
  • 1992-1996: Postdoctoral Fellow, 1992 – 1996, Indiana University (lab of Dr. Norman Pace)

Academic appointments:

  • 1996 – 2001: Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH
  • 2003 – 2014: Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH
  • 2014 – 2016: Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH
  • 2017 – : Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Professional Service (selected, since 2000):

  • 1999 – 2001: ACS, Petroleum Research Fund, reviewer
  • 2004: NIH, Biochemistry Study Section, panel member
  • 2004 – 2005: NIH, NRSA ZGR-1 Genes and Genomes Study Section, panel member
  • 2004 – 2006: NIH, Fogarty International Grant Program Study Section, panel member
  • 2006 – : NSF, Chemistry Division, panel member
  • 2009 – 2010: NIH, Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research, panel member
  • 2006 – 2011: NIH, ICP-1 International and Collaborative Projects Study Section, panel member
  • 2005 – 2012: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK, reviewer
  • 2012: NIH, MSFB Macromolec Structure and Function-B Study Section, panel member
  • 2013: NSF, Chemistry Division, Chemistry of Life Processes Program, panel member
  • 2014: NIH, ZRG1 BCMB-S Biochem and Macromolecular Biophysics, panel member
  • 2014 – 2017: NIH, TWD-B, Training and Workforce Development Study Section, panel member
  • 2017: ISF, Israel Science Foundation, reviewer
  • 2017: NSF, Chemistry Division, Chemistry of Life Processes Program, panel member

Current Teaching

  • Fall 2017: CHM 6302-Chemistry and Biology and Nucleic Acids

 

Vera Diane Harris Grants Assistant
Phone:  352-294-3480
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Willard W. Harrison Dean Emeritus and Professor
Phone:  352-392-7009
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Research interests include trace element analysis, atomic emission/absorption, and atomic mass spectrometry.

Christopher David Haun Graduate Student
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Ru He Graduate Student
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Shuai He Graduate Student
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Wanhong He Graduate Student
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John C. Heaton Vice President of Research and DevelopmentVistakonContact Lens Products
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John is the Vice President of Research and Development for Contact Lens Products at Vistakon, a Division of Johnson & Johnson Vision Care. He has over 20 years of experience in developing and commercializing new products. In his 20+ years at Vistakon he has served in a leadership capacity in numerous key areas including Product Development, Clinical Research, Commercialization Engineering and Materials Science.

John joined Vistakon in 1983 as one of three R&D professionals charged with the development of ACUVUE? contact lenses. He received the Johnson Medal in 1992 for his contributions in the development of ACUVUE? lenses. Since that time he has contributed to the development and commercialization of over 20 products which have contributed to the growth of Vistakon from a $10 Million regional company to a global leader in the industry having sales in excess of $2 Billion.

John holds a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of Florida and an MBA from the University of North Florida and has authored/co-authored numerous patents.

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John F. Helling Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-9132
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Our research deals with theoretical and computational aspects of molecular and materials sciences, with emphasis on the unified treatment of physical and chemical kinetics using quantum molecular dynamics. It includes collision-induced and photoinduced phenomena in the gas phase, clusters, and at solid surfaces. Our aim is to provide a fundamental approach to molecular dynamics, where electronic and nuclear motions are consistently coupled to account for quantal effects. We use quantum and statistical mechanics, mathematical, and computational methods, to describe time-dependent phenomena (such as femtosecond dynamics and spectra) in both simple and complex molecular systems.

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D. Kay Henderson Data Management and Information StrategyBank of America
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Kay is currently with Bank of America in Data Management and Information Strategy. She has been with Bank of America (and legacy organization) for 24 years. Kay has served in a variety of roles from Strategic Planning Manager, Finance Manger, Senior Operations Analyst and Database Administrator (Teradata & DB2). Previously, she had been employed by Southeast Bank, N.A. in Corporate Planning, Commercial Lending and Market Research roles. Prior to that, Kay worked for American Dade division of American Hospital Supply in Market Research (interface between Research & Development and Marketing).

Kay earned her B.S. in Chemistry with high honors in 1980 from the University of Florida, and worked with Dr. E.J. Gabbay’s research group. She earned her Master of Business Administration with concentration in Finance and Marketing in 1982.

Kay is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Florida Blue Key and is in the UF Hall of Fame.

Martha Alejandra Hermosilla Graduate Student
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Megan Rae Hill Graduate Student
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Ethan Daniel Holt Graduate Student
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Nicole A. Horenstein Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-9859
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We integrate tools in organic synthesis, enzymology, molecular biology, andcomputational methods to unravel complex biomolecular interactions and events. One ofour interest areas is carbohydrate chemistry and biochemistry. For example we haveapplied kinetic isotope effects to understand glycosyltransferase mechanisms. A newproject area is focused on study of the biosynthesis of azasugars. These compounds arewell known glycosidase inhibitors that feature a nitrogen atom in the ring, rather thanoxygen. How and why these compounds are produced in bacteria and plants is an ongoingquestion we are investigating. In another project area, we chemically synthesize newprobes and use homology modeling to define structural, functional, and selectivityfeatures of the ligand binding domain within the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Thisis part of a long standing collaboration with Dr. Roger Papke of the University ofFlorida Pharmacology Department.

Weijia Hou Graduate Student
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Yue Hu Graduate Student
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Jiawei Huang Graduate Student
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Yun Huang Graduate Student
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Robert W Huigens III Affiliate Assistant ProfessorAssistant Professor, Department of Medicinal ChemistryUniversity of Florida
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Angela Hyatt Admin Support Ast I
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Imran Iftikhar Graduate Student
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Eugene L. Inman Ph.D. Vice PresidentLilly Research LaboratoriesAnalytical Sciences Research and Development
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Eugene L. Inman, Ph.D., is the vice president of Analytical Sciences Research and Development at Eli Lilly and Company, a major pharmaceutical manufacturer headquartered in Indianapolis, IN. Gene joined Lilly in 1982. He is a trained analytical chemist with six years of industrial experience as a pharmaceutical development analytical chemist, fourteen years as a technical manager, and nine years as an R&D executive. As a manager, he has been responsible for groups of 40 to 700 scientists with expertise in physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, bioanalytical chemistry, organic chemistry, formulations development, biochemistry, clinical trial materials preparation, and project management. His personal passions include Quality by Design, knowledge management, product quality control strategies, global registration documents, leadership development, laboratory quality systems, and pharmaceutical product quality.

Gene graduated from Grace College (Winona Lake, IN) in 1978 with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and mathematics and received his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry in 1982 from the University of Florida under the mentorship of Professor James D. Winefordner.

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Alexander David Jacobs Lecturer
Phone:  352-392-0528
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Shalini Jayaraman Rukmani Graduate Student
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Alice Jempson Senior Secretary
Phone:  352-392-8314
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Sukyung Jeon Graduate Student
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Junlin Jiang Graduate Student
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Tian Jiang Graduate Student
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Yifan Jin Graduate Student
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Jodie Johnson Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-392-8672
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Robert “Bob” Johnson Stores/Rcv Manager
Phone:  352-392-0534
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Austin Lee Jones Graduate Student
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Wesley Jones Senior Vice PresidentGeorgia-PacificOperations Excellence and Compliance
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Wes Jones has served as Senior Vice President – Operations Excellence and Compliance for Atlanta-based Georgia-Pacific since 2007. In this role, he has responsibility for all company manufacturing operations as well as for compliance with all applicable rules, regulations and policies.

A 1976 graduate of the University of Florida with a degree in chemistry, Wes has worked in the pulp and paper industry for more than 35 years. He started his career as a shift supervisor with ITT Rayonier in Jesup, Ga., and also worked for Mead Corp. in Ohio.

During his long career with Georgia-Pacific, Wes has held a variety of leadership roles within the company’s pulp business. He began working with Georgia-Pacific in 1987 at the company’s pulp and paper mill in Crossett, Ark., and moved to the Brunswick, Ga., cellulose mill in 1989. He became head of the Brunswick operations in 1993 and took on responsibility for Georgia-Pacific’s entire fluff pulp business in 1996. He was named President-Pulp in 2003 and led that business through the 2005 acquisition of Georgia-Pacific by Koch Industries. After the acquisition, Wes led the company’s consumer products manufacturing organization until assuming his current role.

Wes is a native of Palatka, Florida and is married to Kathy Weigel Jones.

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William M. Jones Professor Emeritus
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Willis Bradley Jones Graduate Student
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Christopher Paul Kabb Graduate Student
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Oleksandr Kanishchev Post Doc Aso
Phone:  352-392-0591
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Robin Hendrikus Johannes Kemperman Graduate Student
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Bethy Kim Graduate Student
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Tae Hoon Kim Graduate Student
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Robert O. Kincart A-C-T Environmental & Infrastructure, Inc.; American Communications, Inc.; The Kincart Group
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Rob graduated from UF in 1972 with a B.S. in Chemistry. Post graduation, he worked as a research chemist with Glidden-Durkee and Roux Laboratories, but quickly moved into management roles with Kerr-McGee Chemical and, later, with Asgrow/The Upjohn Company in the agricultural chemical industry. Kincart, who was recognized in 2005 as the UF Chemistry Department’s outstanding alumni, also served as the first hazardous materials chemist on the nation’s first fire department haz-mat team out of Jacksonville, Florida circa 1975. Today, as a result of his career-long dedication and expertise in dealing with hazardous materials and their affect on the environment, Kincart is Polk County’s sole honorary Fire Chief.

In 1980, Kincart was a founding partner in Resource Recovery of America, Inc., one of the first environmental services companies in Florida to provide assessment and remediation of contaminated sites. The company was subsequently sold and in 1987 he founded A-C-T Environmental & Infrastructure, Inc. which is headquartered in Bartow, Florida. Today, the firm employs nearly 100 professionals, including scientists and engineers and serves clients nationwide. He is very proud that they have been awarded the Best Place to work in Florida for 2010 and 2011. In addition to these business ventures, in 1995, he co-founded American Communications, Inc., a wireless telephone provider and in 2000 founded The Kincart Group, a real estate investment and development firm.

Kincart encourages employees to get engaged in the community and models the way for “giving back” through his own active involvement. He is a Rotarian, serves on numerous non-profit boards and is also president-elect for the Bartow Chamber of Commerce. He is also the co-chairman of the inaugural Polk County School Board Environmental Career Academy.

Rob resides in Lakeland with his wife, Laurel; their black lab Kacey; three children and six grandchildren. He loves UF, is a Bull Gator and has endowed the Kincart Scholarship in Chemistry at UF.

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Valeria D. Kleiman Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-4656
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New materials with novel photophysical properties are crucial for developing revolutionary molecular-photonic and -electronic components.

We aim at the understanding and control of light-matter interactions and thus discovering new materials for photonics applcations.

Two areas of research are explored in our laboratory. The first one involves the probe of chemical systems in condensed phase, with interest in the energy-transfer area. The goal is to understand novel properties arising not from the accumulation of single units, but those that derive from a macromolecule or polymer as a whole. Central to the project is the use of ultrafast spectroscopy to study energy transport in dendrimers and conjugated polymers whose electronic and optical properties can be chemically controlled at the molecular level.

The second area focus in the control of photochemical reactions through the use of ultrashort phase modulated excitation pulses.

Chemists have long sought to control the branching ratios and product yields of photochemical reactions. Recently, such control became attainable by manipulating the phase properties of excitation pulses, creating quantum mechanical interferences, which ultimately change the reaction outcome. In our lab, processes like isomerization, are investigated, seeking the understanding and control of the reaction mechanisms.

Antoinette Knight Program Assistant
Phone:  352-392-1369
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Brian Knight Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-294-2165
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Steven Kobb Website Administrator
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Jeremy Paul Koelmel Graduate Student
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Karen Marie Koory Graduate Student
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Maria V. Korolev Lecturer
Phone:  352-392-1087
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Tomohiro Kubo Graduate Student
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Grit Kupgan Graduate Student
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Edward Marcell Laguna Graduate Student
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Ouidad Lahtigui Graduate Student
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Derek Austin LaMontagne Graduate Student
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Alison Marianne Lecher Graduate Student
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Mike S. Lee Ph.D. PresidentMilestone Development Services
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Dr. Lee is the President of Milestone Development Services. He actively participates in the development of new technologies and their integration into industrial settings. Prior to founding Milestone Development Services, Dr. Lee was with Bristol-Myers Squibb. He led interdisciplinary teams responsible for rapid analysis of discovery leads and preclinical drug candidates that contributed to the Food & Drug Administration approval of Buspar?, and Serzone?, and the accelerated development and approval of TAXOL?. Dr. Lee is the founder of the Annual Symposium on Chemical and Pharmaceutical Structure Analysis (CPSA). These unique events, held in the US and China, highlight industry-related applications and discussion on real-world experiences with the latest analytical technology and industry initiatives. Dr. Lee is the author or co-author of over 50 scientific papers and patents. He received his BS degree in Chemistry at the University of Maryland in 1982. In 1985 and 1987, he completed his MS and PhD, respectively, in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Florida under the direction of Professor Richard A. Yost.

Yousoon Lee Graduate Student
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Sunidhi Lenka Graduate Student
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Allison Jane Levy Graduate Student
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Gengnan Li Graduate Student
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Guohui Li Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-294-1321
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Hong Li Graduate Student
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Kunhua Li Graduate Student
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Lei Li Graduate Student
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Long Li Graduate Student
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Qiang Li Graduate Student
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Qingjiang Li Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-846-1047
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Xiaowei Li Graduate Student
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Zhiliang Li Graduate Student
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Jiamin Liang Graduate Student
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Ping Lin Scientist
Phone:  352-294-2096
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Jan Linderberg Courtesy Professor
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Beverly Lisk Grants Specialist
Phone:  352-294-3479
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Ji Liu Graduate Student
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Yuan Liu Graduate Student
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Steven Anthony Locicero Graduate Student
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George Locko Ph.D. ConsultantArizona Chemical Company
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George A. Locko attended the Savannah College of Art Design for three years and ultimately earned his B.S. degree in 1969 from East Carolina University. He earned an M.S. Degree in Chemistry from UF in 1971 and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from UF in 1976 under the direction of John Zoltewicz.

George worked his entire career in pine-based chemicals and was promoted to Senior Scientist and then Group Leader early in his career, which began at Union Camp Corporation Technology Center, November 1976. UCC was later merged into International Paper Company (Arizona Chemical Co.). George was instrumental in integrating staff from Arizona and UCC, and in moving operations to Savannah, Georgia, where he eventually held the position of Senior Technology Manager for the 55 person lab. He voluntarily stepped down as Senior Technology Manager in 2011, and assumed role of Sr. Principal Scientist. During the last few years, George has headed up the “New Ideas Database” program, and was instrumental in working with Arizona attorneys in successfully defending patent applications, especially overseas filings. Technical areas of expertise include: Pine-based chemicals/renewable resources; Inks, Coatings, Cosmetics and Flavor and Fragrance chemistries, including “malodor-counteractant” technology (Bush Boake & Allen – now part of IFF); and Patent art. George is the inventor or co-inventor of 13 patents and published patent applications (7 granted US patents).

George has sincere interests in pushing renewable resource chemistries, especially integration of “cross-functional” chemical technologies to expand capabilities/business, and in building business-university ties for mutual benefit. A recent suggestion was to build awareness of Arizona Chemical renewable chemistries/capabilities at UF, and other southeastern universities. He personally developed and sponsored LSU Chem E – Arizona Chemical project in 2009 – 2011 and has visited other universities, mostly in the US.

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Simon Enrique Lopez D’Sola Adjunct Lecturer
Phone:  352-392-9700

Address University of Florida Department of Chemistry PO Box 117200 Gainesville FL 32611 SISLER 329B

Amber Leeann Ayanna Lott Graduate Student
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Joey “Bobby” Lott Lab Manager/Facilities
Phone:  352-392-8161
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Hang Lu Graduate Student
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Yiruo Lu Graduate Student
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Hendrik Luesch Affiliate ProfessorProfessor and Chairman, Department of Medicinal ChemistryUniversity of Florida
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Thomas John Lyons Courtesy Assistant Professor
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Craig Andrew Machado Graduate Student
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Brian Scott MacTavish Graduate Student
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Preet Mahalay Graduate Student
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Jagadeesh Nagendra Manda Graduate Student
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Manasi Dilip Mangaonkar Graduate Student
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Adam Christopher Mansell Lecturer
Phone:  352-294-0453
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Charles R. Martin Crow and Distinguished Professor
Phone:  352-392-8205
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His research interests are in electrochemistry, nanoscience and bioanalytical chemistry. Beginning in the 1980s, his research group pioneered a powerful and versatile approach for preparing nanomaterials called template synthesis. This method has since become a workhorse procedure for preparing nanomaterials, and is used in laboratories throughout the world. His research currently focuses on applications of template-prepared nanotubes and nanotube membranes to electrochemical biosensors and to electrochemical energy.

Professor Martin was the 2009 recipient of the Charles N. Reilley Award of the Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry, the 2005 recipient of the Florida Award of the Florida Section of the American Chemical Society, and the 1999 recipient of the Carl Wagner Memorial Award of the Electrochemical Society. He was promoted to University Distinguished Professor in 2006. In 2007 he received a Nano 50 Innovator Award from Nanotech Briefs. He is a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society, and served, or is serving, on the editorial advisory boards of Chemistry of Materials, Advanced Materials and Small. He is also the Senior Editor of the journal Nanomedicine. He is also an ISI highly cited author in materials science.

Mariko Matsuura Graduate Student
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Gwendolyn McCann Program Assistant
Phone:  352-392-0552
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Lisa McElwee-White Crow Professor and Chair
Phone:  352-392-8768
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Our research involves applications of organometallic chemistry to problems in materials deposition. Recent areas of research include chemical vapor deposition of inorganic films that are of interest for manufacture of semiconductor devices and OLEDs, organometallic precursors for electron beam-induced deposition of nanostructures, and precursors for photochemical metallization of thermally sensitive organic electronics.

Education

  • B.S., University of Kansas, 1979
  • Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1983
  • Postdoctoral Associate, Stanford University, 1983-1985

James McManis Chemist III
Phone:  352-273-7730
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Jorge Israel Medina Graduate Student
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Zhihui Miao Graduate Student
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David A. Micha Emeritus Professor and Adjunct Professor
Phone:  352-392-6977
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Our research deals with theoretical and computational aspects of molecular and materials sciences, with emphasis on the unified treatment of physical and chemical kinetics using quantum molecular dynamics. It includes collision-induced and photoinduced phenomena in the gas phase, clusters, and at solid surfaces. Our aim is to provide a fundamental approach to molecular dynamics, where electronic and nuclear motions are consistently coupled to account for quantal effects. We use quantum and statistical mechanics, mathematical, and computational methods, to describe time-dependent phenomena (such as femtosecond dynamics and spectra) in both simple and complex molecular systems.

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Stephen A. Miller Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-7773
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Our research group is focused on the synthesis and characterization of novel polymers. Two main research areas are explored.

The synthesis of new polymers from readily available biorenewable feedstocks with the specific intent of mimicking commodity thermoplastics. We use chemical approaches to innovate new polymers, focusing on the origin (birth), properties (life), and degradation (death) of eco-friendly and sustainable materials. By incorporating less-studied functional groups into the polymer chain, novel polymer behaviors can be effected. For example, water-degradable polymers can be constructed that do not require the more stringent conditions of biodegradation.

Prof. Miller appears on TV20 to discuss Plastics from Wood

The development of organometallic, single-site catalysts for the polymerization of olefins to polyolefins having novel structure and properties. The catalytic behavior of single-site catalysts can be precisely tuned to afford interesting and commercially promising materials from simple and inexpensive olefins. We target syndiotactic polymers, branched-polyethylene, elastomeric polyolefins, and a variety of copolymers that can only be achieved with carefully engineered organometallic catalysts.

Romain Jeremy Miotto Graduate Student
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Sourabh Mishra Graduate Student
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Alyssa Danielle Mitchell Graduate Student
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Kylie Jo Mitchell Graduate Student
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Erick F. Molina-Rojas Graduate Student
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Hendrik J. Monkhorst Courtesy ProfessorProfessor Emeritus, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-392-1597
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Leonid Leonidovich Moroz Affiliate ProfessorProfessor, Department of NeurocienceWhitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience
Phone:  904-461-4020
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Jarrod James Mousa Graduate Student
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Louis Michel Marie Mouterde Graduate Student
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Andrew Michael Mowson Graduate Student
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Marvin L. Muga Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-1441
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Development of novel, rigorous, computationally tractable theory of molecular energetics and dynamics.

Explicitly time-dependent theory beyond the adiabatic approximation for the study of molecular processes and atomic collisions.

Application of such theory to the study of elementary chemical reactions, such as electron transfer (intra – and intermolecular), energy transfer, and rearrangements.

Application to first principles calculations of rate constants for elementary gas phase reactions.

Application to the interaction of molecular systems with external fields, such as intense laser fields.

pplication to the study of optical and conduction properties of polymeric systems.

Development and application of Green’s function or propagator methods to the theoretical study of molecular spectroscopy.

Justin Robert Mulcahy Graduate Student
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Amrita Basu Mullick Graduate Student
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Aravinda Munasinghe Graduate Student
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Leslie J. Murray Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-0564
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Bioinspired Metal Complexes as Catalysts

Our focus is to design, synthesize, and evaluate transition metal complexes for small molecule activation. In particular, our group is interested in energy-related processes, such as water oxidation, carbon dioxide reduction, and dioxygen reduction.

Metal clusters housed within the active sites of proteins carry out basic and challenging redox reactions, such as carbon dioxide reduction or nitrogen fixation. We expect that well-defined and tunable metal clusters can function as highly efficient catalysts in synthetic systems. Our goal is to develop multimetallic complexes in which a tunable ligands controls the assembly and environment of each metal ion within a cluster (e.g., donor atom type, metal-metal distance). Importantly, one design criterion is that complexes retain an active site, which we anticipate will afford selective reactivity with substrates and increase the catalytic efficiency.

David Murzynski Engineering Technician II
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Photo of Gardiner H. Myers
Gardiner H. Myers Associate Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-0558
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Development of novel, rigorous, computationally tractable theory of molecular energetics and dynamics.

Explicitly time-dependent theory beyond the adiabatic approximation for the study of molecular processes and atomic collisions.

Application of such theory to the study of elementary chemical reactions, such as electron transfer (intra – and intermolecular), energy transfer, and rearrangements.

Application to first principles calculations of rate constants for elementary gas phase reactions.

Application to the interaction of molecular systems with external fields, such as intense laser fields.

pplication to the study of optical and conduction properties of polymeric systems.

Development and application of Green’s function or propagator methods to the theoretical study of molecular spectroscopy.

Soufiane Nadif Graduate Student
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Primali Vasundera Navaratne Graduate Student
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Jason Trevor Newton Graduate Student
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Thanh Lam Nguyen Assistant ScientistQuantum Theory Project
Phone:  512-999-0245
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Thi Hoang Ha Nguyen Graduate Student
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Heather Nichols Coord. of Accounting
Phone:  352-294-3477
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Weijia Niu Graduate Student
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Michelle Marie Nolan Graduate Student
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Olivier Nsengiyumva Graduate Student
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Claribel Nunez Graduate Student
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Jens Oddershede Courtesy Professor
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Photo of N. Yngve Ohrn
N. Yngve Ohrn Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-6979
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Development of novel, rigorous, computationally tractable theory of molecular energetics and dynamics.

Explicitly time-dependent theory beyond the adiabatic approximation for the study of molecular processes and atomic collisions.

Application of such theory to the study of elementary chemical reactions, such as electron transfer (intra – and intermolecular), energy transfer, and rearrangements.

Application to first principles calculations of rate constants for elementary gas phase reactions.

Application to the interaction of molecular systems with external fields, such as intense laser fields.

pplication to the study of optical and conduction properties of polymeric systems.

Development and application of Green’s function or propagator methods to the theoretical study of molecular spectroscopy.

Kathryn Lorraine Olsen Graduate Student
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Photo of Nicolo Omenetto
Nicolo Omenetto Research Professor
Phone:  352-392-9853
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Our research is focused on the use of lasers on atomic and molecular systems. Our analytical goal is the development of novel methods of analysis, or the improvement of the selectivity and the sensitivity of the existing ones. Our fundamental goal is the understanding of the basic interaction processes (linear and non linear, including coherence effects) leading to a measurable emission, absorption, fluorescence and ionization signal. Such understanding will allow obtaining quantitative results without the use of standards, i.e., we will be able to approach absolute analysis.

Fundamental diagnostics of various spectral sources, including plasmas and pulsed glow discharges, are another main theme of our research. Here, lasers can be used merely as sampling devices to introduce the material into the discharge (e.g., laser ablation) or as additional excitation-ionization sources of the species already present in the discharge. Both gaseous and solid samples are studied, in particular fine and ultra-fine aerosols.

A strong link exists between our research interests and those of Prof. Winefordner and Dr. Smith, with a resulting close collaboration.

Nicholas Robert Oranzi Graduate Student
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Neil S. Ostlund Courtesy ProfessorFounder and PresidentHypercube, Inc.
Phone:  352-392-6976
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Nathan Ou Graduate Student
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Paulo Henrique de Souza Paioti Graduate Student
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Gus Palenik Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-6734
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Xiaoshu Pan Graduate Student
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Mukesh Pappoppula Graduate Student
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Anna Pardo OPS – Sec/Clerical
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Matias Ezequiel Pascualini Graduate Student
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Anthony John Pastore Graduate Student
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Rainey Elizabeth Patterson Graduate Student
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Craig Pattillo OPS – Non-Sec/Clerk
Phone:  352-392-0534
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Jakub Pedziwiatr Graduate Student
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Wenbo Peng Graduate Student
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Ajith Perera Associate Scientist
Phone:  352-392-6616
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Scott S. Perry Affiliate ProfessorProfessor, Department of Material Science & EngineeringUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-846-3333
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Photo of Willis B. Person
Willis B. Person Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-0528
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There is growing evidence that the molecules necessary for the evolution of life on earth arrived here from the interstellar medium. The study of these molecules is therefore one of great current interest. To date, over one hundred and twenty molecules have been found to exist in interstellar space. Most of these molecules have been detected by radioastronomy, but others have been found by visible/ultraviolet or infrared spectroscopy. There are two major types of signals from interstellar space that have intrigued and puzzled astronomers, astrophysicists, and astrochemists. They are the so-called “unidentified” interstellar infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). Both have been known for many years, the former for about 30 years and the latter for about 80 years, but the species responsible for them have not yet been found, despite much research. Early on, the thought was that the carriers of these bands were small grains, but, in recent times, it has been agreed that a gas phase molecule-like species is more likely. The conditions under which these molecular species must survive are stark. Temperatures can be extremely cold (10-100K) except, of course, near stars. Pressures are generally lower than any produced here on earth. And the radiation present can run the gamut from microwaves to X-rays and beyond.

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Laura Peterson Lecturer
Phone:  352-294-1364
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Nicole Nicki Peterson HR Specialist I
Phone:  352-392-0543
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Nicolas C. Polfer Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-0492
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Research in our group focuses on increasing the structural information from mass spectrometry measurements for bioanalytical applications. We make use of physical chemistry tools, such as lasers, and develop methods and instrumentation that allow other physical parameters of the ions to be characterized (e.g. infrared absorption), so that “more than the mass” of the ions can be determined. Topical projects include 1) the structural elucidation of metabolites (and other small molecules) based on cryogenic IR spectra, and 2) the differentiation of oligosaccharides based on IR fragmentation patterns.

Ivy Ponder-Gay Administrative Specialist IOrganic Division
Phone:  352-294-1305
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Ivy Ponder-Gay Program Assistant
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Jason Portmess Senior Lecturer
Phone:  352-846-1505
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Photo of David H. Powell
David H. Powell Scientist Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-8782
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There is growing evidence that the molecules necessary for the evolution of life on earth arrived here from the interstellar medium. The study of these molecules is therefore one of great current interest. To date, over one hundred and twenty molecules have been found to exist in interstellar space. Most of these molecules have been detected by radioastronomy, but others have been found by visible/ultraviolet or infrared spectroscopy. There are two major types of signals from interstellar space that have intrigued and puzzled astronomers, astrophysicists, and astrochemists. They are the so-called “unidentified” interstellar infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). Both have been known for many years, the former for about 30 years and the latter for about 80 years, but the species responsible for them have not yet been found, despite much research. Early on, the thought was that the carriers of these bands were small grains, but, in recent times, it has been agreed that a gas phase molecule-like species is more likely. The conditions under which these molecular species must survive are stark. Temperatures can be extremely cold (10-100K) except, of course, near stars. Pressures are generally lower than any produced here on earth. And the radiation present can run the gamut from microwaves to X-rays and beyond.

Robert Wilson Powell, III Graduate Student
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Amanda Michelle Pritzlaff Graduate Student
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Todd Prox Engineer
Phone:  352-392-0565
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Stanley Pych Engineer III
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Pengxu Qi Graduate Student
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Jingjing Qiu Graduate Student
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Julien Racine Post Doc AssociateQuantum Theory Project
Phone:  352-392-6714
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Divya Rajan Graduate Student
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Farhad Ramezanghorbani Graduate Student
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Karnamohit Ajit Ranka Graduate Student
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Lisa Reed Senior Grants Specialist
Phone:  352-392-0538
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Michelle Elizabeth Reid Graduate Student
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John R. Reynolds Courtesy ProfessorProfessor of ChemistryGeorgia Institute of Technology
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David E. Richardson Professor & Dean,
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
Phone:  352-392-6736
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The focus of our group is the study of kinetics. By learning about the kinetics of chemical processes, we can deduce a mechanistic scheme of how chemical transformations occur. Kinetics also allow for understanding the factors that influence the progression of reactions. This knowledge permits us to make changes in the reaction conditions and/or reagents to manipulate the reaction to suit our needs. A number of physical methods are used by our group to probe reaction kinetics including NMR and UV-Vis. From the data compiled, mathematical equations can be developed to describe the chemical process. Computer simulation may be necessary when reactions are too complex for simple mathematical modeling. Our current research interests fall into a couple of broad categories including chemical warfare agent decontamination and transition metal catalysis.

Nathaniel Elba Richey Graduate Student
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Varun Kumar Rishi Graduate Student
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Adrian E. Roitberg Professor
Phone:  352-392-6972
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His main research interest is in accurate calculations of biologically relevant molecular systems and processes using proven methods from Quantum Mechanics, Statistical Mechanics and Molecular Dynamics. He is also interested in advanced visualization.

Christopher David Roland Graduate Student
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Mayra Rostagno Graduate Student
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Pratik Roy Graduate Student
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Qiao Ruan Graduate Student
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Miles Anthony Rubinski Graduate Student
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Dominic Joseph Rucco Graduate Student
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Bradley K Russell-Webster Graduate Student
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John R. Sabin Courtesy ProfessorProfessor Emeritus, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-392-1597
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George Anis Leon Sarkis Graduate Student
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Daniel A. Savin Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-9150
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U.F. Welcomes Dr. Daniel Savin to the Chemistry Department Faculty and Polymer Research

Professor Daniel Savin received a BS in chemistry (1995) from Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, CA. While there he worked for Prof. Kerry Karukstis in the area of biophysical chemistry. He went to graduate school at Carnegie Mellon University where he received an MS in polymer science (1997) and a PhD in chemistry (2002) working for Prof. Gary Patterson. After a postdoctoral position with Prof. Timothy Lodge at the University of Minnesota, he began his independent research career in 2003 at the University of Vermont (UVM) in the Department of Chemistry. He moved to the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials at the University of Southern Mississippi in 2008, and joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Florida in 2015.

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Kirk S. Schanze Prominski & Distinguished Professor
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Research in our lab is focused on the interaction of light with organic and organometallic materials. We have an interest in a number of optical applications such as light emitting devices (LEDs), fluorescent sensors, solar energy conversion and non-linear optical phenomena. In one specific project we are involved in the chemical synthesis and fundamental study of water soluble conjugated polymers (conjugated polyelectrolytes). These materials find application in a number of areas, including fabrication of fluorescent bio-sensors and nano-structured films for use in organic photovoltaic cells. In another line of investigation, we are studying the optical properties of novel conjugated organometallic oligomers and polymers. Finally, we have a long standing interest in the development of thin film based luminescent oxygen sensor materials which are used by aerodynamic engineers to measure air pressure distributions on wind-tunnel models.

Georg Scheutz Graduate Student
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Sarah Kaitlyn Scott Graduate Student
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Photo of Steven M Scott M.D.
Steven M Scott M.D. ChairmanScott Holdings, LLC
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Professional Experience

Steven M. Scott, M.D. serves as chairman of Scott Holdings, LLC, an entrepreneurial medical investment company. He is the founder of Vista HealthPlan, a nationwide HMO which was built from five troubled HMOs he purchased and consolidated into one branded plan. Dr. Scott worked closely with the Florida Department of Insurance during the acquisition and consolidation of Vista. He consolidated and improved the operations to make Vista profitable, and Vista, with revenues of $1.2 billion and 300,000 members, was sold in July 2007 to Coventry Health Care, Inc.

Dr. Scott also founded, and formerly served as chairman of, Phoenix Physicians. Phoenix Physicians, founded in 2003 provides emergency department physicians practice management for hospitals and municipalities throughout the country.

Dr. Scott also invests and funds various health care enterprises throughout Florida and the southeast.

Charitable and Civic Experience

Since the sale of Vista Healthplan, Dr. Scott has made a commitment to serve on Boards that further higher education development, particularly in graduate education and research.

In January 2007 Governor Crist appointed Dr. Scott to the Board of Trustees of the University of Florida (Gainesville). Dr. Scott was confirmed by the Florida Senate and continues to serve as a trustee.

In December 2008 Dr. Scott was honored for his participation in leadership in the state by Florida Blue Key, the University of Florida’s leadership honorary organization.

In July 2010 Dr. Scott was appointed to the Board of Trustees of the Duke University Health Science Center.

Dr. Scott also serves on advisory boards at the Babcock School of business at Wake Forest University as well as the Women’s Health Advisory Board at Duke University.

Dr. Scott continues to be committed to graduate education in the State of Florida and meeting the work force requirements for medical research firms and Bio Tech firms (like Scripts and Burnham research institutes) which relocate or expand to Florida.

Personal

Dr. Scott is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Between teaching, private practice and the development of niche health care enterprises, Dr. Scott has nearly 35 years of experience in medicine and medical administrative businesses.

He received his medical degree from Indiana University Medical Center and completed his residency training at the Duke University Medical Center. In 1978, Dr. Scott was appointed and continues to serve as the Assistant Consulting Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Duke. He was licensed originally in Indiana and currently is licensed in most states by reciprocity, including Florida and North Carolina. He is a member of the American Medical Association, the North Carolina Medical Society and the Florida Medical Society among others.

Married with five children, Dr. Scott lives in Palm Beach County, Florida.

Eric Scriven Research Coordinator II
Phone:  352-392-0554
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Louis Alan Searcy Graduate Student
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Daniel Seidel Professor
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Daniel Seidel is joining the faculty of the Department of Chemistry in August, 2017, as Professor of Chemistry. Professor Seidel has an international reputation in the area of synthetic organic chemistry, his interests focusing mainly on synthesis and catalysis with an emphasis on nitrogen containing compounds The broad interests of his research group are consistent with the Department’s initiative to increase visibility in the area of discovery chemistry. Dr. Seidel has published over 90 peer-reviewed papers. Among other honors, he has been an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, a Humboldt Research Fellow and a Fellow of the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science.

Steven Shen Graduate Student
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Howard Sheridan M.D. ChairmanEdison Bancshares
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Dr. Sheridan is a 1965 gator chemistry grad and 1969 Tulane Med School grad. He practiced diagnostic and interventional radiology in Fort Myers, Florida where he served as president of the medical staff of Southwest Florida Regional Medical Center. He is co-founder and past Chairman of the Board of Radiation Therapy Services. RTSI is the largest provider of radiation therapy services in the U.S. He is co-founder of Edison National Bank and serves as Chairman of Edison Bancshares. He is an avid wildlife photographer and his photos have been published in National Geographic, Alaska Magazine, Island Scene Magazine, and Montana Magazine. His community service includes conservation work where he and his wife Brenda were named “Water Conservationists of the Year” by the Florida Wildlife Federation for their work on protecting the Caloosahatchee River and the manatee. He also co-founded 21st Century Care , a non-profit dedicated to provide cancer assistance to the needy, cancer education, and research.

David N. Silverman Courtesy ProfessorDistinguished Professor Emeritus, Department of Pharmacology & TherapeuticsUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-392-3556
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Kandice Simmons Chemical Technician II
Phone:  352-294-1326
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Michael Boyer Sims Graduate Student
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Adhish Singh Graduate Student
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Prashant Kumar Singh Graduate Student
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Khushboo Sinha Graduate Student
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Adam Nicholas Smith Graduate Student
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Benjamin W. Smith Scientist
Phone:  352-392-7016
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Research areas include spectroscopic methods for chemical analysis such as emission, absorption, fluorescence and ionization; laser-material interactions, plasma and plasma spectrochemistry.

Benjamin Craig Smith Graduate Student
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Brian Floyd Smith Engineer
Phone:  352-392-0565
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Ian Robert Smith Graduate Student
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Justin Steven Smith Graduate Student
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Ania Sotuyo Graduate Student
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John F. Stanton William R. Kenan Professor of ChemistryQuantum Theory Project
Phone:  512-293-9622
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The Stanton Research Group investigates theoretical chemical physics, particularly quantum chemistry and its application to problems in molecular spectroscopy.

Education

  • B.G.S. University of Michigan 1984
  • M.S. University of Michigan 1984
  • Ph.D. Harvard 1989

James Scott Sternberg Graduate Student
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Jon D. Stewart Professor
Phone:  352-846-0743
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We develop new methods for asymmetric organic synthesis based on enzymes. These efforts include the discovery of novel enzymes by computational and experimental approaches, the development of strategies to rapidly assess their catalytic properties, their applications to organic synthesis and solving problems associated with reaction scale-up.

A second part of our research focuses on developing “smart” nanostructures that assemble and disassemble in response to environmental cues. This project is a collaboration with groups in the Department of Chemistry (Martin) and the Department of Anesthesiology (Dennis and Rogers). We combine our expertise in synthesis and biochemistry with our collaborators’ strengths in nanotechnology and medicine.

Kimberly Denise Stewart Graduate Student
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Gregory Alan Strange Graduate Student
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Xiaoming Su Graduate Student
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Photo of Brent S. Sumerlin
Brent S. Sumerlin George B. Butler Professor of Polymer Chemistry
Phone:  352-392-0563
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We are interested in materials composed of well-defined polymers with selected functionality, composition, and molecular architecture. Particular focus is on water-soluble polymers that are stimuli-responsive. Such “smart” polymers have the ability to self-assemble or dissociate in solution in response to changes in their surroundings. Potential target applications include controlled and targeted drug delivery, surface modification, and self-healing materials. Our interests are at the interface of bio-, organic, nano-, and polymer chemistry, with particular focus on fusing the fields to prepare materials with synergistic properties.

1.Functional polymer synthesis and efficient polymer modification via specific and orthogonal methodologies. A significant effort is dedicated to devising new synthetic routes to functional macromolecules. In addition to relying on living/controlled radical polymerization techniques to prepare polymers of controlled molecular weight and retained end group functionality, highly efficient postpolymerization modification is required to incorporate functionality not easily included in monomer, initiator, or chain transfer agents. Many chemical transformations employed in organic synthesis do not demonstrate the same degree of efficiency and orthogonality when used for functionalization of high molecular weight macromolecules. Therefore, a significant effort in our group has involved the extension of “click chemistry” methodologies for functional polymer synthesis.

2.Stimuli-responsive water-soluble block copolymers. The solution behavior of polymers that exhibit “smart” behavior in aqueous media is being investigated. Responsive block copolymers can be induced to form micelles, vesicles, or gels, and may ultimately lead to new applications in controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, and surface biocompatibilization.

3.Dynamic-covalent macromolecular materials. By constructing macromolecular assemblies with linkages that are reversibly covalent, we prepare new materials with the ability to adapt their structure, constitution, and reactivity depending on the nature of the surrounding environment. Reversibility being a key attribute, these systems offer versatility typically associated with supramolecular materials (dynamic rearrangement, self-assembly, self-repair, etc.), while maintaining the integrity and robust nature of covalently formed polymers. Materials constructed via covalent bonds that can be triggered to dissociate in response to specific chemical stimuli include smart nanoparticles, organogels, and self-healing coatings.

4.Smart polymer-protein bioconjugates. Modifying biological molecules with “smart” polymers provides a means to externally control the solubility and activity of proteins, peptides, and nucleic acids. Examples of such hybrid materials include polymer-protein conjugates in which the activity, stability, or solubility of the protein can be tuned by capitalizing on the responsive nature of the immobilized synthetic polymer.

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Martina Sumner Senior Lecturer
Phone:  352-392-0517
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Hao Sun Graduate Student
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Brendan Charles Sweeny Graduate Student
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Daisuke Takahashi Graduate Student
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Daniel R. Talham Professor
Phone:  352-392-9016
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Our group is currently divided between three different materials chemistry and biomaterials chemistry projects. The theme that unites them is an understanding of the importance of surfaces and interfaces.

Magnetic nanostructures and thin films. The first series of projects centers on magnetism and related properties in nanostructures and thin films of synthetic inorganic networks. This class of materials differs from traditional magnets in that synthetic chemistry can be used to prepare systems that combine properties, such as photomagnetism.

Biomolecules at inorganic interfaces. This series of projects probes the binding of biomolecules to synthetic inorganic surfaces. Biomolecule adsorption at surfaces is important for many applications, including sensing and biochip technologies. We develop inorganic surface chemistry aimed a introducing specific ligand/metal interactions that can be used to bind and orient biomolecules at surfaces.

Biomineralization. Our understanding of organic/inorganic interfaces is used to explore important biomineralization processes. Biological inorganic solids generally grow with the help of a biomolecule interface. We are exploring the details of these processes in both purposeful biominerals, such as in shells and bones, and pathological biominerals, such as kidney stones.

Photo of Weihong Tan
Weihong Tan Jackson & Distinguished Professor
Phone:  352-846-2410
Email: 

Bioanalysis

Chemical Biology

Nanomedicine

Biomedical Engineering

David B. Tanner Affiliate ProfessorProfessor, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-392-4718
Email: 

I-Ting Teng Graduate Student
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Larry Frank Tesler Graduate Student
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Charles Seth Thomoson Graduate Student
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Jessica Thompson Administrative Support AST I
Phone:  352-392-0545
Email: 

Vivian Thompson Program Assistant
Phone:  352-392-4654
Email: 

Annaliese Elizabeth Thuijs Graduate Student
Phone: 
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Photo of Fred Thurston D.M.D.
Fred Thurston D.M.D. Central Dental CreationsThurston Comprehensive Dental Center
Phone: 

Dr. Thurston grew up in Clearwater FL, and continued his education at the University of Florida, receiving his Bachelor of Chemistry Degree in 1976 and Doctor of Dental Medicine Degree in 1979 from the University of Florida. He started a private practice in downtown Auburndale, FL and Thurston Comprehensive Dental Center is proudly celebrating 31 years of Family and Cosmetic dentistry. He has been committed to Implant Dentistry since 1989. For the last 19 years Dr. Thurston has been very involved in Dental Laboratory Manufacturing. Central Dental Creations became incorporated in 2005 and is now a dental manufacturer. Dr. Thurston is committed to Dental education as well as the business communication and technology advances of Dentistry.

Dr. Thurston and his wife of 38 years have 3 children. They enjoy Gator football, Harley Davidson’s and Motor homing.

John Thomas Tokarski Graduate Student
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Photo of Anna Brajter Toth
Anna Brajter Toth Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-7972
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Our focus is on the development of biosensors exploiting novel materials and nanotechnology for key bioanalytical applications. Our bioanalytical research is supported by new mass spectrometry methods at the interface with electrochemical and LC methods.

Nhi Thao Tran Graduate Student
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Trang Theresa Tran Graduate Student
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Samuel Trickey Courtesy ProfessorProfessor Emeritus, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-392-1597
Email: 

Prabhanshu Tripathi Graduate Student
Phone: 
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Yu-Hsuan Tsai Graduate Student
Phone: 
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Bryan Scott Tucker Graduate Student
Phone: 
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Donna Turner Laboratory,
SR Teaching Spec
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Umar Tariq Twahir Graduate Student
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Galyna Vakulenko Administrative Support Ast I
Phone:  352-392-0549
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Photo of Martin T. Vala
Martin T. Vala Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-0529
Email: 

There is growing evidence that the molecules necessary for the evolution of life on earth arrived here from the interstellar medium. The study of these molecules is therefore one of great current interest. To date, over one hundred and twenty molecules have been found to exist in interstellar space. Most of these molecules have been detected by radioastronomy, but others have been found by visible/ultraviolet or infrared spectroscopy. There are two major types of signals from interstellar space that have intrigued and puzzled astronomers, astrophysicists, and astrochemists. They are the so-called “unidentified” interstellar infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). Both have been known for many years, the former for about 30 years and the latter for about 80 years, but the species responsible for them have not yet been found, despite much research. Early on, the thought was that the carriers of these bands were small grains, but, in recent times, it has been agreed that a gas phase molecule-like species is more likely. The conditions under which these molecular species must survive are stark. Temperatures can be extremely cold (10-100K) except, of course, near stars. Pressures are generally lower than any produced here on earth. And the radiation present can run the gamut from microwaves to X-rays and beyond.

Photo of Adam S. Veige
Adam S. Veige Professor
Phone:  352-392-9844
Email: 

Overview

Our research group is primarily interested in the design, synthesis, isolation, and characterization of novel inorganic molecules. Our efforts are concentrated towards building new complexes that either model or affect new small molecule transformations relevant to the industrial sector. We undertake detailed mechanistic studies in order to uncover subtle details of catalytic processes in hopes of building upon or challenging current models of molecular structure, periodic trends, reactivity, and bonding.

Methods

Students will become experts in the art of air-sensitive molecular manipulations that require the careful use of ultra-high vacuum-line and inert glove-box techniques. Students will become familiar with a variety of spectroscopic methods. One- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography will be applied extensively.

Outlook

We hope our work will reveal new catalytic transformations that convert inexpensive commodity or feedstock compounds into higher value products for upstream use in specialty chemical synthesis, polymer synthesis, and pharmaceutical manufacturing. We expect to build new molecules that defend or challenge current mechanistic models.

On April 13, 2017, the University of Florida Research Foundation named Professor Adam Veige as one of 34 UFRF Professors for 2017-2020. UF recognizes faculty members for having distinguished current records of research and strong research agendas likely to lead to continuing distinction in their fields.

In August, 2017, Professor Adam Veige was awarded a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellowship for Research in Japan. Researchers of all countries having diplomatic relations with Japan are eligible for this fellowship. Japanese researchers who wish to host overseas researchers in Japan can submit applications. Dr. Veige was nominated by his host researcher, Yasuyuki Tezuka, of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Their research theme was, “Precision Designing of Cyclic Polymers for Innovative Soft Materials.”

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Melanie K. Veige Senior Lecturer,
Director of General Chemistry
Phone:  352-392-0518
Email: 

Angelo Marcelo Veloro Graduate Student
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Mayra Vendramini Tuiche Graduate Student
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Sudarsan Venkat Ramani Graduate Student
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Prakash Verma Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-392-6715
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Peter Vertesaljai Graduate Student
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Kenneth B. Wagener Director,
CMSE
Phone:  352-392-2012
Email: 

The common theme that defines our research relates to synthetic polymer chemistry and how it might be used in creating well defined polymer structures. A large part of our work is devoted metathesis reactions, where the research has been mechanistic in nature. We immerse ourselves in the chemistry associated with creating new polymers, and we also find ourselves interested in modeling well known materials, like polyethylene, to better understand their behavior.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

University of Florida, Gainesville. George B. Butler Professor of Polymer Chemistry and Director, Center for Macromolecular Science and Engineering. Teaching, research, and administration related to organic and polymer chemistry. Research group pioneered acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) polymerization, engaged in synthesis of precision model polymers for polyolefins, biologically directed polymers, morphological investigation of fuel cell membrane polymers, preparation of latent silicon elastomer structures. Joined faculty as Associate Professor of Chemistry in 1984. ADMET reaction now found in textbooks, internationally recognized as an integral part of poly-mer chemistry. 110 Students (undergrad, grad, and postdoc) have passed through research group to date.

Akzo Nobel nv, American Enka Research, Enka, NC. 1973 – 1984. Research Department Head and Technical Director. Directed activities related to polymerizations and structure/property determinations – research in medical membranes, nylon, polyester & cellulose fibers, biopolymers, polymerization catalysis, conductive polymers, poly-mer decomposition, and NMMO solvents for cellulose. Employed in various positions within this Dutch & German corporation. Continuous consulting in Europe with Akzo Nobel and sister companies the past 25 years.

Promoted four times during this eleven year period (Research Department Head; Membrane Research Section Head; Research Scientist, Polymers; Senior Research Chemist) – served as Technical Director /Membrana, Inc. (an AKZO new venture in California), the last position I held prior to entering academics.

University of North Carolina at Asheville, NC 1975 – 1984 Adjunct Professor of Chemistry. Evening teaching of organic and polymer courses (two courses each year) while working at Akzo Nobel during the day.

Shuo Wan Graduate Student
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Jiliang Wang Graduate Student
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Shuai Wang Graduate Student
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Xirui Wang Graduate Student
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Yanyue Wang Graduate Student
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Yuting Wang Graduate Student
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Cassandra M. Watkins Administrative Support Assistant IIBiochemistry Division
Phone:  352-392-4303
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Blair Anthony Weaver Graduate Student
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Jason F. Weaver Professor
Phone:  352-392-0869
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Education

  • PhD, Stanford University, 1998
  • MS, University of Florida, 1993
  • BS, University of Florida, 1992

Michael Weaver Adjunct Lecturer,
Post Doc ASOQuantum Theory Project
Phone:  352-392-8113
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Michael Shenming Wei Graduate Student
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Photo of W. David Wei
W. David Wei Associate Professor
Phone:  352-392-2050
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The goal of this team is to develop a vibrant and productive research program focusing on discovering novel electronic and optical properties of metallic and semiconductor nanomaterials and their implications for electronics, photonics, energy, and biomedicine. A fundamental understanding of the structure-dependent localized optical properties of nanostructures with sub-10 nm resolution will lead to comprehensive knowledge of the surface plasmon-directed growth of novel anisotropic nanostructures, and design rules for the synthesis and fabrication of hybrid nanostructures with optimized properties for solar energy harvesting, conversion and storage, photocatalysis, and chemical and biological detection. All these projects are high impact and interdisciplinary in nature that combine analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, inorganic chemistry and materials science and engineering. These exciting, multidisciplinary projects will be launched this August. Postdocs, graduate students and undergraduates who are interested in joining our team are more than welcome to contact me at wei@chem.ufl.edu.

Asmerom Okubaslassi Weldeab Graduate Student
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Photo of William Weltner Jr.
William Weltner Jr. Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-2155
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During the 1960s, we were world leaders in developing atomic fluorescence spectroscopy and phosphorimetry for trace analysis. During the 1960s and 1970s, we were world leaders in using signal-to-noise calculations and measurements to optimize atomic and molecular spectrometric methods. In the 1970s to the present, we have been world leaders in the use of lasers in atomic fluorescence spectrometry, atomic emission breakdown spectroscopy, Raman spectrometry and molecular luminescence spectrometry.

Our research in the past 5 years has been mainly directed towards several unique developments, including the modeling and applications of laser induced plasmas produced in aerosols, on solids, and in liquids. These studies involve measurements of the emission characteristics of various laser plasmas and application of physical principles to obtain fundamental information, including plasma temperatures, species number densities, and line broadening. Our applications of laser plasmas have been applied to both mineral samples as well as organic materials in order to obtain both quantitative results as well as composition. The other current major project involves the development of an imager based upon either resonance ionization or fluorescence of either mercury or cesium atoms in a specially designed cell. This study has involved fundamental spectroscopy studies of Hg and Cs. The imager will detect RayLEI scatter, Raman scatter, and fluorescence and will be used for a number of applications including imaging of skin diseases, varicose veins, arterial blockage of arteries, as well as moving and vibrating objects, such as materials in an assembly line. Although these two major current projects are not the only ones in progress, they demonstrate the current excitement and effort in my research group. Research in the Winefordner group involves a direct collaborative interaction with Professor Nicolo Omenetto and Dr. Ben Smith.

Larry Westra Building Projects Specialist
Phone:  352-392-6455
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Photo of Kathryn R. Williams
Kathryn R. Williams Scholar Emerita
Phone:  352-392-7369
Email: 

During the 1960s, we were world leaders in developing atomic fluorescence spectroscopy and phosphorimetry for trace analysis. During the 1960s and 1970s, we were world leaders in using signal-to-noise calculations and measurements to optimize atomic and molecular spectrometric methods. In the 1970s to the present, we have been world leaders in the use of lasers in atomic fluorescence spectrometry, atomic emission breakdown spectroscopy, Raman spectrometry and molecular luminescence spectrometry.

Our research in the past 5 years has been mainly directed towards several unique developments, including the modeling and applications of laser induced plasmas produced in aerosols, on solids, and in liquids. These studies involve measurements of the emission characteristics of various laser plasmas and application of physical principles to obtain fundamental information, including plasma temperatures, species number densities, and line broadening. Our applications of laser plasmas have been applied to both mineral samples as well as organic materials in order to obtain both quantitative results as well as composition. The other current major project involves the development of an imager based upon either resonance ionization or fluorescence of either mercury or cesium atoms in a specially designed cell. This study has involved fundamental spectroscopy studies of Hg and Cs. The imager will detect RayLEI scatter, Raman scatter, and fluorescence and will be used for a number of applications including imaging of skin diseases, varicose veins, arterial blockage of arteries, as well as moving and vibrating objects, such as materials in an assembly line. Although these two major current projects are not the only ones in progress, they demonstrate the current excitement and effort in my research group. Research in the Winefordner group involves a direct collaborative interaction with Professor Nicolo Omenetto and Dr. Ben Smith.

Photo of James D. Winefordner
James D. Winefordner Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-0556
Email: 

During the 1960s, we were world leaders in developing atomic fluorescence spectroscopy and phosphorimetry for trace analysis. During the 1960s and 1970s, we were world leaders in using signal-to-noise calculations and measurements to optimize atomic and molecular spectrometric methods. In the 1970s to the present, we have been world leaders in the use of lasers in atomic fluorescence spectrometry, atomic emission breakdown spectroscopy, Raman spectrometry and molecular luminescence spectrometry.

Our research in the past 5 years has been mainly directed towards several unique developments, including the modeling and applications of laser induced plasmas produced in aerosols, on solids, and in liquids. These studies involve measurements of the emission characteristics of various laser plasmas and application of physical principles to obtain fundamental information, including plasma temperatures, species number densities, and line broadening. Our applications of laser plasmas have been applied to both mineral samples as well as organic materials in order to obtain both quantitative results as well as composition. The other current major project involves the development of an imager based upon either resonance ionization or fluorescence of either mercury or cesium atoms in a specially designed cell. This study has involved fundamental spectroscopy studies of Hg and Cs. The imager will detect RayLEI scatter, Raman scatter, and fluorescence and will be used for a number of applications including imaging of skin diseases, varicose veins, arterial blockage of arteries, as well as moving and vibrating objects, such as materials in an assembly line. Although these two major current projects are not the only ones in progress, they demonstrate the current excitement and effort in my research group. Research in the Winefordner group involves a direct collaborative interaction with Professor Nicolo Omenetto and Dr. Ben Smith.

Russell W. Winkel Graduate Student
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Ryan Patrick Wolf Graduate Student
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Qiong Wu Graduate Student
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Yung-Chien Wu Graduate Student
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Tianyuan Xiao Graduate Student
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Weihuang Xu Graduate Student
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Hamad Ahmad Yadikar Graduate Student
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Shen-Han Yang Graduate Student
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Xi Yang Graduate Student
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Yajing Yang Graduate Student
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Yindong Ye Graduate Student
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Photo of Richard A. Yost
Richard A. Yost Professor
Phone:  352-392-0557
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Research in our group centers around three aspects of analytical mass spectrometry and related techniques: instrumentation, fundamentals, and applications. Instrumentation development includes projects in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and ion mobility, including the development of the first laser microprobe MS/MS system able to image trace levels of drugs and biomolecules in tissue specimens. Fundamental studies in our group employ both experiment and computer modeling/simulation to explore such issues as ion motion and ion-molecule interactions in high-field ion mobility. Applications of the techniques developed in our group include a wide range of studies in clinical, pharmacological, biotechnological, environmental, and forensic analysis.

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Vaneica Y. Young Associate Professor Emeritus
Phone:  352-392-4651
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Aleksandra Zagulyaeva Graduate Student
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Julia Zavala Academic AssistantUndergraduate Program
Phone:  352-392-0558
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Charles Jason Zeman Graduate Student
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Jingwei Zhang Graduate Student
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Liqin Zhang Graduate Student
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Wanyi Zhang Graduate Student
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Xiaoquang Zhang Affiliate ProfessorProfessor, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Florida
Phone:  352-392-6971
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Xinxing Zhang Graduate Student
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Yuchao Zhang Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-294-2147
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Yunlu Zhang Graduate Student
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Zuxiao Zhang Graduate Student
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Ning Zhao Graduate Student
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Wenbo Zhao Graduate Student
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Xueying Zhao Teaching Lab Specialist II
Phone:  352-846-0840
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Yan Zhao Graduate Student
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Yue Zhou Graduate Student
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Sanyong Zhu Adjunct Assistant Scientist
Phone:  352-294-3443
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Yu Zhu Graduate Student
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John A. Zoltewicz Professor Emeritus
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UF

 

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