Four faculty members receive 2017-2020 University Term Professorship Awards

Congratulations go out to professors Steve Bruner, Rebecca Butcher, Jon Stewart, and David Wei who were selected to receive University Term Professorship Awards this year. These UF professorship awards have a duration of three years and recognize faculty for their superior academic accomplishments. Thank you Steve, Rebecca, Jon, and David for your outstanding work in research and teaching and helping to make the Department of Chemistry a place of academic distinction with your scholarship.

A look back at the birth of the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer

The triple quadrupole mass spectrometer has become the most common mass spectrometer in the world today, with sales of over $1 billion per year. It is today the gold standard for quantitative analysis in metabolomics, clinical analysis, drug discovery and development, environmental analysis, and a wide variety of other application areas. That invention, by Professors Yost and Enke, along with related research in their labs, has helped propel mass spectrometry into the one of the most commonly used analytical methods in the world.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=whEO8kspM_g

Prof. Christou’s group publishes three Nature papers in three months

“Distinguished Professor�George Christou’s group�has published three papers in�Nature�journals during the fall semester. They are the initial publications from three new directions in his program. Two are in ‘molecular nanoscience’ projects targeting bottom-up syntheses of monodisperse nanoparticles of important metal oxides: “Molecular analogue of the perovskite repeating unit and evidence for direct MnIII-CeIV-MnIII�exchange coupling pathway”, A. E. Thuijs�et al.,�Nature Commun.�2017, 8, 500 (doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-00642-0); “Atomically-precise colloidal nanoparticles of cerium dioxide”, K. J. Mitchell�et al.,�Nature Commun.�2017, 8, 1445 (doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-01672-4). They were based on work by graduate students Annaliese Thuijs (now at Intel Corp.) and Kylie Mitchell (now at Innophos Inc.), respectively. The third is in a bioinorganic project to develop structural and functional models of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in plant and cyanobacterial photosynthesis: “A bioinspired soluble manganese cluster as a water oxidation electrocatalyst with low overpotential”, G. Maayan�et al.,�Nature Catalysis, online article�doi:10.1038/s41929-017-0004-2, with his postdoc Galia Maayan (now Assistant Professor at the Technion, Israel).”

Prof. Christou’s group publishes three Nature papers in three months

Distinguished Professor George Christou

Distinguished Professor George Christou’s group has published three papers in Nature journals during the fall semester. They are the initial publications from three new directions in his program. Two are in ‘molecular nanoscience’ projects targeting bottom-up syntheses of monodisperse nanoparticles of important metal oxides: “Molecular analogue of the perovskite repeating unit and evidence for direct MnIII-CeIV-MnIII exchange coupling pathway”, A. E. Thuijs et al., Nature Commun. 2017, 8, 500 (doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-00642-0); “Atomically-precise colloidal nanoparticles of cerium dioxide”, K. J. Mitchell et al.Nature Commun. 2017, 8, 1445 (doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-01672-4). They were based on work by graduate students Annaliese Thuijs (now at Intel Corp.) and Kylie Mitchell (now at Innophos Inc.), respectively. The third is in a bioinorganic project to develop structural and functional models of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in plant and cyanobacterial photosynthesis: “A bioinspired soluble manganese cluster as a water oxidation electrocatalyst with low overpotential”, G. Maayan et al.Nature Catalysis, online article doi:10.1038/s41929-017-0004-2, with his postdoc Galia Maayan (now Assistant Professor at the Technion, Israel).

Prof. Christou’s research is in synthetic and physical-inorganic chemistry of the transition metals, and spans molecular nanoscience, bioinorganic chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, and molecular magnetism.

Sebastian Acosta-Calle receives the 2017 Keaffaber Scholar Award

“Congratulations to Sebastian Acosta-Calle, who has been named the recipient of the 2017 Keaffaber Scholar Award. The award has been made possible through the generosity of Dr. Jeffrey Keaffaber, a longtime friend and supporter of the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Keaffaber received his Ph.D. from the Department in 1989 (with Prof. William Dolbier, Jr.) and has enjoyed a career in industry, entrepreneurship, consulting, and teaching. Within the Department of Chemistry he has served as a senior lecturer, undergraduate advisor, and pioneer of new teaching initiatives.”

Sebastian Acosta-Calle receives the 2017 Keaffaber Scholar Award

2017 Keaffaber Scholar Award

Congratulations to Sebastian Acosta-Calle, who has been named the recipient of the 2017 Keaffaber Scholar Award. The award has been made possible through the generosity of Dr. Jeffrey Keaffaber, a longtime friend and supporter of the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Keaffaber received his Ph.D. from the Department in 1989 (with Prof. William Dolbier, Jr.) and has enjoyed a career in industry, entrepreneurship, consulting, and teaching. Within the Department of Chemistry he has served as a senior lecturer, undergraduate advisor, and pioneer of new teaching initiatives.

The Keaffaber Scholar Award recognizes the overall excellence in research and academic scholarship of one of our senior chemistry majors. To be eligible for the award, the undergraduate must be research active within the Department of Chemistry and committed to pursuing a Ph.D. in chemistry. This year’s recipient, Sebastian Acosta-Calle, is pursuing a Bachelor’s of Science degree in chemistry. He has been working in the lab of Dr. David Wei for two years, conducting research in physical chemistry. His research involves the design and synthesis of a plasmonic photo-catalyst with LSPR-mediated photothermal effects. The purpose of his research is to enhance the utility and performance of palladium nanoparticles in catalytic hydrogenation reactions of olefins. In the spring of 2017, Sebastian was awarded the University of Florida’s University Scholars Program Award and the Department of Chemistry’s Chemical Physics Scholarship for his undergraduate research. In the fall of 2017, Sebastian was named NSF Florida-Georgia LSAMP Scholar for his academic achievements. Sebastian plans to pursue a PhD in chemistry with a focus in synthetic chemistry. His goal after earning his PhD is to obtain a research position in academia.